2014.04.13

Constructors should not cause side effects

Going to talk about something simple that took me a while to figure out I was doing it wrong. Don’t know when I realized it was a big mistake, I just know that it is something I’ve been trying to avoid for a while.

To begin, I’m not the first one to get into this conclusion. Many people before thought about the same thing, it is even one of the JSLint rules (“Do not use ‘new’ for side effects”). The thing is, I don’t think most people know the reason why this should be avoided; so let me explain why.

Constructors are not verbs

I believe that methods should be named as verbs, to make it clear that they perform actions.

new XMLHttpRequest doesn’t fire the request, new HTMLDivElement() shouldn’t append it to the document, … – Elliott Sprehn

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2014.01.12

Callbacks, Promises, Signals and Events

Sometimes I get involved in discussions on twitter and Facebook related to development. This week I ended up sending a link to an old(ish) twitter thread explaining when to favor Promises/Callbacks and when to use Signals/Events for asynchronous operations. I think this topic deserves further explanation.

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2013.05.15

Linked Lists for Dummies

On high-level languages like JavaScript we usually don’t care about how the objects are stored in the memory, we let the VM handle it for us, and since the language contains Arrays most users never find a need for Linked Lists even tho it’s a very powerful and useful data structure.

Like most front-end developers I don’t have a Computer Science degree and started to program using high level languages, it took me a while to stumble into Linked Lists, that’s why I’m going to explain the basic use cases, pros/cons of this simple data-structure and why it’s widely used. - You probably used it before without knowing.

This post was motived by this tweet:

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2012.12.10

Travis CI : Continuous Integration Made Easy

This weekend I spent some time improving the structure of some of my open source projects repositories and also finally decided to add a Travis-ci hook to the most active/newest ones.

Travis is a free continuous integration server for open source projects that can be used to automate tests and help you deal with projects that have multiple contributors. If you are familiar with GitHub you probably seen their build status icons on a few projects before (on the image above). It can be used to test multiple languages like JavaScript, PHP, Python, Ruby, Java and many others. It also have options to notify the project maintainers every time the build status changes or on each commit. (email, IRC, campfire, etc)

It is really easy to setup it if your tests are already executed on the command line. If the tests needs a browser to work you can hook a headless browser like PhantomJS. - For my projects I’m just executing the tests on node.js for now since that should be enough to catch most errors. - Having a headless browser can help to double check if the code works on multiple environments.

Travis documentation is very clear and the amount of boilerplate is minimal, for a regular node.js project you just need a file named .travis.yml on the root folder containing:

 language: node_js
 node_js: 0.8

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2012.10.29

Node.js Protip: Avoid Global Test Runners

Some of the most popular Node.js test frameworks advertise that they should be installed globally: Jasmine, Mocha, Buster.js, etc… I consider this an anti-pattern.

On this post I will try to explain why it’s an anti-pattern and show how to avoid global installs by using npm test instead.

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